Three Festive Reads

While we are still in that daze of those days between Christmas and New Year I thought I would share three of my favourite reads of 2018.

  1. Father Christmas and Me by Matt Haig

I first started reading the books of Matt Haig last year – and his festive novels were my starting point. Therefore, when I spotted ‘Father Christmas and Me’ in paperback this festive season, I had to read it.

This was a lovely third festive novel. It dealt beautifully with the theme of difference and the uncertainty that many (especially the young) feel about trying to fit in.

The clash of the Easter Bunny and his team wanting to ruin Christmas gives Amelia (our young heroine) to not only save Christmas, but also cement her place in Elfhelm.

I enjoyed the humour in the novel and, although it is part of a series, it can be a standalone novel. Enjoyable all the way through.

2. One Day in December by Josie Silver

The lovely Miss W gave me ‘One Day in December’ as a Christmas gift. I was so excited, as I had spotted this novel all over the Bookstagram world.

This is a lovely read – a modern romcom. Girl almost meets boy, but girl and boy become friends and life starts to happen to them both, but not quite in the way either hopes.

I can not spoil this book for anyone who would like to read it, however I have to issue a mascara warning – for tears of sadness and tears of joy.

3. Miss Marley by Vanessa Lafaye

I am a huge fan of ‘A Christmas Carol’; it is a story that always guaranteed to evoke a festive mood. I am also a fan of those authors who have the guts to take on the stories of some of our most established classic characters.

I saw an article that talked about how Sarah Marshall had to complete Vanessa Lafaye’s work, as she died before she was able to. This made me even more intrigued to read this book because they clearly had both a great friendship and a deep appreciation of Dickens’ work.

It is clever that it is told from the point of view of Jacob Marley’s sister. It offers us the tale of her and her brother and, and why Marley becomes the ghost we all know so well. It is a tale that provides us with some answers/predictions to the background of the famous characters.

I really enjoyed this book and may need to make this as much of a tradition as the original ‘A Christmas Carol’.

Do you have any favourite festive reads I should plan for next year?

Mr Dickens and His Carol by Samantha Silva

The very final festive read of the season – I promise, especially as we approach twelfth night.

I picked this book up based on its title; I did not read the blurb or anything because the title had enchanted me enough. I am, as mentioned in a previous post, a huge fan of ‘A Christmas Carol’, so the mere hint of that tale always catches my attention.

This novel is a respectful story about how one of the world’s most famous Christmas tales came to be. It does not attempt to retell the tale; it simply imagines how the book came to be. It is known that, at the time of writing, Charles Dickens had a need for money but that he also made a comment on the social situation of Victorian England. This novel touches on those ideas but it also offers a much more romanticised and sentimental twist on the tale. Although, if this was the truth, it would be another near-perfect festive tale.

There is gentle comedy throughout the novel, but also clear heart-wrenching moments that will bring a tear to your eye. In fact, as I closed the book for the final time, I was shedding a few happy tears because at its conclusion (just like ‘A Christmas Carol’) it restores your faith in human nature.

I may be as bold as to state that, with her debut novel, Samantha Silva has created a modern-day classic and a fabulous little tribute to Mr Dickens and his work.

The Final Festive Read of 2017

Welcome to 2018 – I hope that it is a very happy reading year for you all.

I am starting this year just rounding off the final two festive reads that made it into the end of 2017. (I am still reading a festive-themed book at the moment, but it is not finished, so I can not quite sneak it in there just yet).

The Mistletoe Murders by PD JamesĀ 

I have not read many PD James novels, but I have listened to radio adaptations and watched TV versions, so I decided that I wanted to give some of her works a go. After enjoying a collection of short stories earlier in the year from Jojo Moyes and being attracted by the festive title, I decided on this one. I do have admiration for authors who can tell a story in such a short space of time, especially a crime story (I am a huge Sherlock Holmes fan, after all), and PD James does this in these stories in such style. What really impressed me was that they had some dramatic twists in such a short space of time. Those that are big fans of her detective, Dalgliesh, will not be disappointed as he does make an appearance in some of the tales employing his critical thinking skills to find the solution. For a festive read (or at any time of year if you are crime fiction fan), I would certainly recommend this book.

Christmas Pudding (A Novel) by Nancy Mitford

I remember being introduced to the work of Nancy Mitford by my mum in my early teens. I had always been fascinated by the Mitford sisters, as there is so much drama surrounding that name that they engage the imagination of so many of us. Nancy’s novels are so full of social observation and gentle humour that they are simply a joy to read, and this book was no exception. All based around the festive season in the countryside, and all the pomp and ceremony that comes from that, but of course the complex and sometimes ridiculous love lives (or not) of all the characters that are involved. It has you giggling (and even possibly slightly cringing) from the very beginning, and you can not put it down as you are simply too intrigued about what is going to happen to each of the characters. For a full-blown 1920s Christmas experience, this is the book to read.

Any festive read recommendations out there to get me ready for this year?

The Girl Who Saved Christmas by Matt Haig

I know we are in those strange days between Christmas and New Year, when you feel you need to do all the things that you have not done as you have been busy in the Christmas bubble. For me, it is also a time when I need to make sure that I catch up on all those blog posts that I have missed, especially as one of my main focuses has been the chance to read.

So, just before the Christmas craziness began, I read ‘The Girl who Saved Christmas’ by Matt Haig. It was a delight! It was all the things that you want from a Christmas story and was a well-crafted nod to the work of the classic author Charles Dickens; in fact, dare I say that I enjoyed it even more than ‘A Boy called Christmas’, which I have also blogged about this festive season.

Amelia (who you meet at the very end of ‘A Boy called Christmas’) is not in a festive spirit, as she is orphaned at Christmas and is resident at Mr Creeper’s workhouse. Losing her belief in the miracles of Christmas is having a detrimental on the work of Father Christmas, as the magic of Christmas is fading and he is not able to carry out his work. He must find her and restore her faith so that Christmas Day can be saved. It is a classic Christmas adventure involving a whole host of colourful characters who want to save the big day and the faith of Amelia, and restore the magic of Christmas.

To me, this novel is a tribute to Dickens and his work. There are cleverly named characters reflecting their part in the tale, but it is also a comment on the state of Victorian society and, sadly, not that far from the truth for some in modern times.

This is truly a children’s novel that can be enjoyed by readers of all ages, so if you want to find or be reminded of your faith in the festive season (and you love ‘A Christmas Carol’ – book or film adaptations), then this is the novel for you – because Amelia Wishart really is the girl who saves Christmas for her and all of us.

 

Crime at Christmas by C H B Kitchin

December means festive reading; however, I have had this title on the shelf for two years and finally picked it up this year. I was drawn to this book because, on the cover, it had the lovely words ‘A Classic Festive Mystery’. I think there is something very romantic about the crime novels of the early 20th century. They are not, necessarily, written to shock but to tell a crime story for the enjoyment of the readers.

This novel did not disappoint. An out-of-town house (not quite country), an unusual collection of house guests for the festive season and cold, dark weather – seriously, what else do you need? Oh, of course, the injured gentleman detective (Mr Warren), just to ensure that a crime really will happen.

Now, I do not write spoilers because I want people to go out and pick the books up themselves. So all I will say is that this is a wonderful classic crime, with different strands running through to keep your brain working. One thing I liked the most about this book was it had the traditional gathering at the end for the big reveal. Although, even that had a mini cliffhanger which made the book so thrilling.

This book was published in 1935 and is still a novel that can be picked up and enjoyed today, especially on these cold winter nights.

A Boy Called Christmas by Matt Haig

The festive season is full swing and that has inspired me to pick books with a festive theme. I decided to start with ‘A Boy Called Christmas’ by the very talented Matt Haig. This may be a children’s book but, to be honest, that never puts me off a title; the most important thing is that you enjoy what you are reading – and I certainly enjoyed this book! (Feeling even more festive once I had finished it.)

This novel answers a question I am sure we have all pondered: how did Father Christmas become Father Christmas? (The same question that Matt Haig’s own son had, and which he took on the challenge to answer.) We all follow Nikolas on his childhood adventure to the far North after he decides that he needs to find the father he loves, and his only real family, who has not returned from his own journey there with the hunters.

As we would all expect, it is not a journey without challenges on so many different levels. He is captured by elves, who may not be quite as you expect, and he discovers that his father may not be all the man he thinks he is – until the going gets tough, and love and respect shine through. By the end of the tale, and I never like to write a review with a spoiler, we are all let into the secret of how Father Christmas became Father Christmas.

This novel is an instant Christmas classic, in my humble opinion, because it is full of magic and adventure, hopes and dreams, and a collection of colourful, magical characters – even a mouse that is a little bit of fond of cheese. The theme throughout that really made me smile, and can sometimes be lost in all the festive frenzy, is about how the most important thing in life is those that we have around us, and making the most of what we have and how we can help others. This is a novel that will make you laugh out loud and celebrate the success of goodness over evil – and realise that nothing is impossible if you put your mind to it.

There is so much festive spirit and cheer in this novel that you can not help but feel ready for some Christmas fun with those that you love by the time you reach the end. (And keen to read ‘The Girl Who Saved Christmas’, which also happens to be on my festive to-be-read pile.)