The Chain by Adrian McKinty

This is a book that I have had an eye on for quite a while, and October seemed like the perfect time to pick it up.

I was not really sure what this book was about other than it is a thriller. And, wow, what a thriller it is. A cleverly told story that delivers so much more than you expect.

Not only do you get the initial thrilling read in part one, but it really does have you asking how far you would be willing to go for your family. It is so hardm as I do not want to spoil anything about the slick and stylish thriller. However, through all of part one you will be on the edge of your seat and, if you can cope with all of that, you are in for even more of a thrilling read.

Part two is even more of a treat. This part reveals so much of ‘the chain’ and its reasons and causes. Quite a study of human nature and what makes people the way they are. There is an almighty twist as we are working towards the conclusion of the novel – it is not a total surprise, but it certainly adds to the tension of the novel.

This is another book with a brilliantly selected title in the phrase ‘The Chain’. Not only is it a named ‘organisation’ at the heart of the story, but it also had me thinking about the chain of events that make each of us who we are. Especially as there is really quite a collection of chracters in this novel.

If you really enjoy a well-crafted thriller, and a chilling one at that, then this is the book for you – especially as the dark nights close in.

Eight Pieces of Silva by Patrice Lawrence

I am always excited to read new books by Patrice Lawrence and, when ‘Eight Pieces of Silva’ hit the shelves this summer, I knew I needed to find a copy.

This book did not disappoint, and I found it a page-turner from the moment I started it. This is a mystery novel, but not in the totally usual sense.

Silva doesn’t return home after taking her parents to the airport and her sister, Becks, is worried. As time passes Becks realises her sister may need her help and finds eight clues in Silva’s room, which reveal a whole secret life Becks and her family had no idea about.

What is so brilliant about this novel is that it tackles a whole number of key issues in its well-crafted and engaging narrative. Becks deals with her complex relationship with family, friends and her own romantic relationship. As well as ideas about healthy and unhealthy ‘romantic’ relationships of others in the tale – and the importance about talking about emotions and mental health.

However, what is again wonderful about a book from the pen of Patrice Lawrence is that there is a brilliant collection of characters. And at the centre is the brilliant Becks – a strong female lead character who knows exactly who she is and exactly what she likes.

This is a fantastic YA novel which I hope many readers will enjoy. There are so many important lessons amongst the pages and, hopefully, it will encourage conversations about many of them too.

The Guest List by Lucy Foley

October is my favourite time of year for thrilling reads. And ‘The Guest List’ is certainly that – in fact, I am even willing to go as far as to say it is better than ‘The Hunting Party‘.

This, as with all books with an element of suspense, is a hard book to offer a blog post on, as I do not wish to inadvertently issue any spoilers. However, I can tell you that this book had all the brilliant ingredients of a thrilling read. An isolated island, a whole host of characters carrying secrets, and twists and turns. Part of the reason I loved this book was that I managed to pick up some of the clues that were scattered throughout the story but I did not spot them all, so some of the reveals were a surprise.

I was not particularly a fan of the number of characters. Although, as the story is told, you do begin to change your view of many – sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse.

I think, overall, this tale seemed more slick than ‘The Hunting Party’. And, although it was still a tale of secrets and lies, this just seemed maybe a little more complex. Yet, I still enjoyed both and think Lucy Foley is a great modern thriller writer. I would definitely be willing to read more stories from her imagination.

Thursday Thoughts: Does it matter what I read?

I am sure you have realised that I absolutely love reading. And I will happily give almost anything a go (although I am not really a Sci-fi fan). However, I do think sometimes people feel judged by their reading choices and that is really not wha this hobby is about. In fact, if you think you would enjoy a book you should read it.

I really enjoy YA fiction – I am not the target audience, but who cares? All that matters is that it is the chance to read a good story. And, to be honest, it is an opportunity to learn something and see things from other perspectives, and develop empathy for those who may be the target audience.

However, I also dislike some of the snobbery that comes with genres, like the idea of ‘chick lit’ or ‘beach reads’. What is wrong with books with strong female characters? After all, surely ‘Little Women’ is a perfect piece of ‘chick lit’ classed as a classic. And surely a beach read is something that helps you unwind on a holiday, and that is certainly different for all of us.

So, do not worry about the books you want to read – if it makes you happy and helps you unwind, then pick it up and enjoy the escapism.

The Courage to Care by Christie Watson

Wow – this book could be one of my books of the year. I could not put this brilliant book down. Tandem Collective gifted me a copy of ‘The Courage to Care’ and it really is a book everyone should read, especially in the current situation.

Watson shares incredible anecdotes about what it is to be a nurse and have the courage to care. We all know that nursing is not a simple job, but this really highlights all the different roles and positions, not only within the NHS and hospitals, but for patients and their families a nurse takes on. I read this book, sometimes crying, realising that all of those people who take on a caring role are very special.

However, this book also has Christie Watson reflecting on her own experiences of adopting a little boy. There was a whole lot of courage in making the decision that she and her partner can care for a little boy who needs a new start in life.

And, as Covid-19 struck, so many NHS staff were left on the front line not only supporting their usual patients, but offering to help so many more.

This book does tackle some really difficult subjects surronding physical health, mental health and difficult experiences that may be a trigger for some. It is all handled sensitively, but it may mean some readers would rather approach the book with caution.

Yet, for me this is a beautiful book that can teach us so much about those who got to work every day to care for others. And it will have you reflecting on your life, priorities and the courage you have to care – especially when it can really make a difference.

The Good Thieves by Katherine Rundell

I was very kindlu gifted a copy of Katherine Rundell’s new book by Tandem Collective UK. This was one that I was very keen to read, as I think Rundell writes fantastic adventure stories for children. And, an early bold statement, I think this is my favourite so far.

‘The Good Thieves’ whisks you to twenties New York, an era that has always fascinated me. Vita wants to set things right as her Grandfather has been cheated out of his beloved home by a local ‘gangster’. Vita fearlessly gathers together a group of talented friends to help her carry out her incredible plan.

This is quite an edge-of-your-seat adventure as Vita and her new friends attempt to take on Sorrotore and his men. There are twists and turns that will keep you turning the page and wishing you could join them for the adventure. It is also a book that proves you should never let things put you off aiming for your dreams.

For me, this was just a beautifully crafted story full of adventure, hope and love. So, if you or someone you know loves a classic adventure story, then this is the book to pick up. Especially as the illustrations are wonderful too – really taking you on an armchair adventure.

Thursday Thoughts: Who is your Favourite Detective?

I do not claim to have read all novels starring every single famous literary detective – however, I do enjoy a good piece of crime fiction!

Before I start, I have previously done a piece about Poirot versus Miss Marple. For me, Poirot won and he would again in that debate. Yet, would my opinion be swayed if I was to throw other characters into the mix?

Well, he would be ever so slightly pipped to the post of my favourite detective. You see, for me, it is the tales from the pen of Sur Arthur Conan Doyle that can be read over and over again. The greatest detective is Sherlock Holmes, with his companion Dr John Watson. There are tales I never get bored of. I can read them, watch them, listen to them, repeatedly, without ever getting bored. I know the solution, but I still love following the adventures. I have never really been able to put my finger on one specific reason why these stories are my absolute favourite – it is not down to one thing. Conan Doyle’s writing and characterisation just bring me back, time and time again to the books. And I do believe that they are responsible for my love of crime novels.

Because, let’s be honest, if I had read the tales of the great Sherlock Holmes, I would not have read so many of the other famous literary detectives. As mentioned, I love the cosy crime of Christie’s two main famous creations, but I also enjoy the investigations of Rebus, Morse, Scarpetta, Pirie (newly discovered) and there are so many more for me to discover.

So, I am interested in your thoughts – who is your favourite detective?

The Heatwave by Kate Riordan

This month’s ‘Tasting Notes Book Club‘ pick was ‘The Heatwave’. This was not what I was expecting, and was a prime example of not judging a book by its cover.

By looking at this book, I thought it was going to be a ‘summer read’. Something easy and gentle to enjoy as the summer draws to an end. However, this book is so much more. This is a sophisticated and stylish thriller – you will be hooked as soon as you start, because the mysterious atmosphere is generated almost immediately.

Set during a heatwave in France, Sylvie returns to a family house in the south. She is keen to sell the house and, with it, hopefully leave painful memories in the past. The question is – what exactly did happen to Elodie? What is the past that Sylvie is trying to forget?

Told between the past and the story’s present, there is an excellent slow pace to the tale that builds suspense and mystery. In fact, you feel as though you are in the south of France enjoying the slower pace of life in the summer. Although, it feels there is always an element of threat hanging over the tale in its present and its past.

I think this is a book that I could have easily overlooked if I had not been part of the ‘Tasting Notes Book Club’ – so, that is another reason why book clubs are such a fantastic idea. If you are looking for an atmospheric thriller as summer fades, this is the book for you!

Circe by Madeline Miller

So, as encouraged by my buddy read of ‘Song of Achilles’, I took ‘Circe’ off the to-be-read pile. It was well overdue that I entered Circe’s world.

To begin with, this book did not grab me as immediately as ‘The Song of Achilles’. However, I think that this is simply because of my knowledge of Circe and her tale was a little weak. As the book progressed, I did get sucked into the world and the story. It was fascinating how her story became entwined with the stories of so many other key Greek mythological figures.

Circe, considered a witch, is banished by her family – rejected by those who should love her Circe builds her own life on her isolated island and possibly becomes an even greater character than if she had stayed with her family.

This is quite a slow-paced book, but beautifully written. It is also quite an eye opener as to the treatment of women in Ancient Greece. Circe certainly breaks the mould as she manages to create her own destiny and stands up to many of those who tackle her.

Just like ‘The Song of Achilles’, this book has made me want to find out even more about the great figures of Greek myth. Although, sometimes I have to admit I am unsure why some of these men (mainly) were regarded as heroes when they were really quite questionable chracters.

Still Life by Val McDermid

This was my first novel by Val McDermid (other than her retelling of ‘Northanger Abbey’) and I am very thankful to have been gifted a copy to read and discuss.

Immediately, I was sucked in, because I absolutely love a good crime novel. The book was atmospheric from the start, and I needed to know what was going to happen next and where this whole tale was going.

McDermid also creates excellent characters. I was a big fan of DCI Pirie. Do no get me wrong, she has character flaws as all good fictional detectives do. But she is someone that you can imagine sitting down with to have a G&T and a chat. McDermid’s villains in this tale are fabulous, too, as you could easily believe that they could commit the crimes of the story.

Yet, the thing I really like about this book is so simple – the title. There is so much meaning about the phrase ‘Still Life’. Not only could it point to the theme of art and a styl, but it points to the ideas of life ending – and the idea that life returns and continues. There is, in fact, so much of the book in that two-word title.

Val McDermid’s writing is charming and creates a real page-turner. I am really keen to read more of her work. Especially to find out more Karen Pirie’s earlier life.