An Unwanted Guest by Shari Lapena

Sometimes you just want to read a contemporary thriller – often with a dark or blue cover with a white or yellow font – and ‘An Unwanted Guest’ fits that criteria perfectly.

This is a locked room mystery – by this I mean it is set in one confined space with a small cast of characters, one of whom must be the villain. It reminded me a little of the Christie classic ‘And Then There Were None’.

Our cast of characters have all arrived at a secluded guest house during a winter storm. So, let’s be honest, we know that there are going to be problems of some kind. Of course, it also appears that this combination of people is not going to have anything in common. However, as the atmosphere becomes more tense, secrets begin to be uncovered and cracks appear in the facade.

Of course, I do not want to write a review that contains spoilers (which can sometimes be difficult with these thrillers), so this may be a little short and sweet. I will say that this is a page-turner because, to be honest, we are always keen to know who did or did not do it. However, for me, I would have liked a little more of the investigation process, as it was a little bit of a simple solution after a good build-up. Although, like all good thrillers, there was another sudden twist in the tale – the story is never quite over.

Have you read any good thrillers recently? I am always keen to hear recommendations.

The Scarlet Plague by Jack London

One of my favourite places ever is a local Oxfam charity bookshop. It is always like a wonderland of books, as it often brings to your attention books that you did not even know you needed. The last time I entered the shop, that is exactly what happened to me. Nestled in the classics section was a novella by Jack London called ‘The Scarlet Plague’ and it immediately grabbed my attention. I have never read a book by Jack London (although ‘The Call of the Wild’ is on my to-be-read pile) but I have had a an interest in him since my first visit to Canada, when I discovered that he had ventured on the Klondike Trail.

‘The Scarlet Plague’ is a great little read and a book that I am a glad I have decided to read as an introduction to London’s work. This is one of those classics that was set in the far future (post-2013) but actually is still very relevant today. In fact, the date if this tale is irrelevant but the story is highly relevant – and is a stark warning of what could happen if almost ALL of mankind was to be wiped out by plague. It is a fascinating study of how the world would have to start again and those who had never experienced the ‘modern’ world would never really be able to comprehend it – it would seem stranger than fiction.

I thought this book was wonderful and a great, undiscovered gem. Have you ever stumbled across a surprise, joyful read?

The Screwtape Letters by C.S Lewis

I have admired and been a little bit fascinated by C.S Lewis since I was a child. I was drawn into his Narnia world when I watched the original TV adaptations, repeatedly listened to the radio adaptations – and, of course, as a bookworm read the Narnia novels. However, that was as far as my knowledge of his literary work went (although his links to the beautiful city of Oxford always sparked my imagination too).

However, my mum had often told me that I should read ‘The Screwtape Letters’, so when I spotted it in the local Oxfam bookshop, I picked up a copy (after all, you are not breaking your book-buying ban when the money goes to charity obviously).

Before I even started reading the book properly, I spotted the dedication to J.R.R Tolkien and decided that this was a book I had to read, as that is a literary friendship I would have loved to have witnessed.

I feel that this is a book that I may need to read more than once. This is a book of many layers and I do not think that reading it once really brings it all to your attention. The demon Screwtape writing to his nephew is such a fascinating idea. Lewis clearly uses this is a tool to be able to pass comment on mankind and human nature. He uses his wit and, in some cases charm, to pass some really rather damning commentary on the world that man inhabits.

Again, like many of these books of some of our great writers of the past, it is a book that could have been written for the modern audience. Sadly, it emphasises some of the follies that could explain this crazy world we are currently living in – after all, we really only have ourselves to blame.

Have you read any of Lewis’ work (other than Narnia)? Where could I take my reading adventure next?