The Final Festive Read of 2017

Welcome to 2018 – I hope that it is a very happy reading year for you all.

I am starting this year just rounding off the final two festive reads that made it into the end of 2017. (I am still reading a festive-themed book at the moment, but it is not finished, so I can not quite sneak it in there just yet).

The Mistletoe Murders by PD James 

I have not read many PD James novels, but I have listened to radio adaptations and watched TV versions, so I decided that I wanted to give some of her works a go. After enjoying a collection of short stories earlier in the year from Jojo Moyes and being attracted by the festive title, I decided on this one. I do have admiration for authors who can tell a story in such a short space of time, especially a crime story (I am a huge Sherlock Holmes fan, after all), and PD James does this in these stories in such style. What really impressed me was that they had some dramatic twists in such a short space of time. Those that are big fans of her detective, Dalgliesh, will not be disappointed as he does make an appearance in some of the tales employing his critical thinking skills to find the solution. For a festive read (or at any time of year if you are crime fiction fan), I would certainly recommend this book.

Christmas Pudding (A Novel) by Nancy Mitford

I remember being introduced to the work of Nancy Mitford by my mum in my early teens. I had always been fascinated by the Mitford sisters, as there is so much drama surrounding that name that they engage the imagination of so many of us. Nancy’s novels are so full of social observation and gentle humour that they are simply a joy to read, and this book was no exception. All based around the festive season in the countryside, and all the pomp and ceremony that comes from that, but of course the complex and sometimes ridiculous love lives (or not) of all the characters that are involved. It has you giggling (and even possibly slightly cringing) from the very beginning, and you can not put it down as you are simply too intrigued about what is going to happen to each of the characters. For a full-blown 1920s Christmas experience, this is the book to read.

Any festive read recommendations out there to get me ready for this year?

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