Munich by Robert Harris

I am not usually a fan of historical fiction. Usually, the reason being that they do not seem to get the balance between description and narrative. Setting the scene often seems to come at the cost of the narrative. However, Robert Harris does not fall into the trap. I do not know if it is because he covers events (in this novel) that people may have a little general knowledge of and, therefore, he does not have the same need to paint a picture, as his narrative does it for him with some of the characters that are really rather well-known.

Munich covers those events that happened immediately before World War Two. The meeting between Hitler and Chamberlain is imagined in Harris’ novel. Not only is that played out as the Allies are desperate to avoid a second war, but two young men, one on each side, may carry secrets that could change the course of history. Can the friendship and experiences of the past help change the events to come?

Munich carefully blends historical events and characters with fiction to create a thrilling story. You feel as though you are part of the events, experiencing the complex relationship between the leaders, almost as a fly on the wall. As tension builds elsewhere, you hope that right will triumph over wrong (even though you know the true outcome of events).

This is the first of Robert Harris’ novels I have read with a historical connection (I did read Conclave) but it has certainly made me keen to read others.

Do you enjoy historical fiction? Any suggestions of novels to try?

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