The ABC Murders by Agatha Christie

Reading a novel by Agatha Christie at this time of year is like a hug. Although this is not a festive read, it has been selected by ‘The Maidens of Murder’, as the BBC has an adaptation of this classic in its festive TV schedules.

One reason why this novel makes me happy is that our dear friend Hastings provides us with the narrative (well, the parts that they can). Returning to a novel with one of my favourite fictional teams already means I will enjoy the story. And I did…

I found this to be one of Christie’s most clever tales. You really do fall for the huge red herring that is marked for you from the start – even though you know you probably should not. Our murderer really does go out of their way to try and get away with murder.

Of course, you know that Poirot will always get his target. However, this also reminded me of Sherlock and his foe Moriarty, as this is more of a case of puppet and a puppet master as many of their classic encounters can be.

As a bold statement, I think this could be one of Poirot’s most wonderful cases – especially as the big reveal was as much of a surprise to me as the characters in the room with man himself.

I would like to thank ‘The Maidens of Murder’ for encouraging me to read of a scope of Christie’s work – I look forward to more in 2019!

Death in the Clouds by Agatha Christie

I always wonder if it is worth posting about my latest Agatha Christie read because, well, they are not new titles and so many of you may have read them and not really be interested in my thoughts. However, when I explore that world out there I realise how many of us love Agatha Christie’s work and the character of Poirot.

I was keen to pick up a Poirot after reading ‘Poirot and Me’ by David Suchet. I picked ‘Death in the Clouds’ because it is one that I haven’t read but remember fondly from the ITV series. Although, it makes me sad when Hastings is not on the scene, you can always rely on Inspector Japp to lighten the mood and he does that delightfully in this book.

The joy of this story is that the crime takes place on a plane and nobody notices. Additionally, the investigation takes our hero between Britain and France – it is indeed a very continental investigation. There are, of course, all the other magic ingredients of a good murder mystery: eccentric characters, scandal, secrets and the big Poirot reveal.

This is not my favourite Poirot story but I still enjoyed every single page because there is something incredibly engaging about the words of Agatha Christie.

Last week, I also listened to ‘Death on the Nile’ on Radio 4 Extra and discovered ‘Maidens of Murder’ on Instagram. All of this together simply means that there is even more love of Agatha Christie in my life, and made me realise that if I want to share my thoughts why the heck not, because so many of us love Poirot.

Sad Cypress by Agatha Christie

So, I am pretty sure I have mentioned that I am a fan of Poirot. After all, I did do ‘A Murder on the Orient Express’ post last year. (Go and check it out if you haven’t already)

Sometimes I am just keen to read a good old-fashioned crime novel and, based on that I picked ‘Sad Cypress’ from my to-be-read pile. And, let’s be honest, I was not going to be disappointed by some quality time with Poirot and his little grey cells.

I enjoyed this novel because this is a crime that Poirot needs to solve to save Elinor Carlisle from the gallows. Her guilt has been decided by many before Poirot takes on the case with jealousy being given as the main motive, especially, by those who like a little bit of gossip. It is always fun to follow Poirot on his journey to solving the crime. There is always a charm to Christie’s novels which almost makes you wish you were part of the tale. And ‘Sad Cypress’ was no different.

So, if you are a fan of Christie Crime Classics (and if not, why not?) this is the novel for you.