Lost You by Haylen Beck

A new thriller to me this summer is ‘Lost You’ but Haylen Beck. To begin with, well from the title, I thought it may be the usual tale of relationships within a family. However, I was a little wrong. This was a clever and slick tale which did not at all follow the path I was entirely expecting. In fact, it raises quite some moral questions.

I do not wish to spoil the plots and twists of this book – always an issue when you come to review/share thoughts on a thriller. However, this is certainly not your usual missing child thriller – it is far more complex that that. All the moral questions are raised around the ideas of surrogacy – and potential power games and manipulation of vulnerable people (for many different reasons).

As the tale develops, I am not sure that the twists are a surprise, however it is still a well constructed narrative and a page-turner. Quite a study of people’s psychology and the impact events can have.

A book for fans of modern thrillers, especially with a very modern theme.

The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

A creepy house in the highlands of Scotland, slightly strange children and a poison garden – what a recipe for a novel.

‘The Turn of the Key’ is an excellent thriller, clearly inspired by the chilling 19th-century ghost stories – a well-crafted, serious page-turner. Ruth Ware has managed to bring thrilling, chilling stories bang up to date.

A dream job very quickly becomes a nightmare. Rowan answers an advert for an idyllic-sounding nannying job in Scotland. However, the family’s state-of-the-art house does not make the job easy. There are many unexplained goings-on and the children are not accepting Rowan the way she hoped. However, there is far worse to come…

This book, told as a reflective letter, is a compelling read. I found myself keen to know what was going to happen. In fact, I did not see any of the twists coming. On reflection, there were hints of one or two, but the biggest twist was the excellent reveal.

This is a great book for anyone who enjoys thrillers and mysteries. A really enjoyable and well-written read. I am glad, again, to have discovered a new author. My only regret is that i did not read it during Autumn, as it would be perfect foe those darker, stormier nights.

Perfect Crime by Helen Fields

This book was sent to me as part of a Secret Santa bookswap at the end of last year. I am, always, willing to give a good crime novel a go and discover new authors, so was intrigued to see what was in store for me.

The setting for this novel is Edinburgh – such an atmospheric city and one that does seem to inspire some wonderful crime novels. Our detectives, DI Callanach and DCI Ava Turner, are called in to investigate the death of a man who only a week before had been talked out of committing suicide – so maybe this is not suspicious, this time he actually went through with it? Until there are a number of other deaths – clearly murders – of people who have been known to consider taking their own lives.

Alongside this, the handsome-but-troubled Callanach is dealing with his own demons – and could even find himself a suspect in a murder investigation.

I really enjoyed this novel as a good piece of crime fiction. I did work out the culprit for one of the mysteries (possibly due to my love of crime novels), but was completely in the dark for the other.

This has all the ingredients of a good modern thriller: secrets, well-crafted characters, pace and complex romance.

I have read this as a standalone novel, although it is a series and this is not the first book, but I am keen to read the others. Another set of titles for the ever-growing to-be-read pile.

The Man Who Didn’t Call by Rosie Walsh

This was a book that I found a little bit frustrating. It was almost a Black Sheep read for me; I was clost to giving up at about 20% of the way through, but I powered on. I am glad that I did , as by the end it was gripping page-turner. Just a bit of a shame it took a while to get there.

I am not going to share any spoilers. The idea of the novel is excellent – if a man does not call in this day and age, could it lead you to become obsessed with other ways of contacting them? Could that lead to you feeling as though you see them everywhere?

However, the really clever thing about this book is how Rosie Walsh leads the reader on some great false paths. As the tale unfolds, she reveals some real surprises and so many things are not quite as they seem. This is what made me appreciate that I had not given up on the book.

For me, there were just a few chapters which were not essentila to the take and caused my attention to wobble a little. Especially as this was my read on the commute, which means I really need my attention held at all times.

Have you read ‘The Man Who Didn’t Call’? What were your thoughts?

Random Attachment by Gertrude T Kitty

I was lucky enough to win a copy of ‘Random Attachment’ by Gertrude T Kitty. And, what can I say, I am so glad I did. My copy arrived in a parcel of lovely goodies, but the loveliest touch was the inscription at the front of the book.

This is a YA crime thriller (although definitely for the older YA audience) and a real page-turner. Dark. gripping and chilling, it takes you on quite a rollercoaster ride.

Mia, a council estate girl, has a troubled background she is keen to escape. Fynn, a posh boy, has been born into a wealthy background, although not without its own troubles. They are drawn together, but in the shadows is The Wolf, stalking and kidnapping local girls – if not worse. Mia and Flynn find themselves in this dark world as Mia is keen to find the truth – or is she the target?

I am so glad that, through the great Bookstagram community, I have managed to find Gertrude T Kitty’s work. She has a real passion for sharing her stories with the world, and I hope that this little blog post will help other keen readers discover her work. Especially as her second novel, ‘The Rebirth of Henry Whittle’, has just hit Amazon.

If you are a fan the gritty crime thriller then ‘Random Attachment’ is a book you will enjoy and want to dive into. So, why not support an author who has a real passion for her work and a love of bringing her to readers?

The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley

Bookstagram made me do it – this was the novel that closed 2019 for me and I am so pleased that it did.

‘The Hunting Party’ was a book that I could not put down. In fact, it was the perfect travel companion as it made a recent train journey absolutely fly.

A New Year’s Eve tradition of a getaway for a group of old friends does not quite go according to plan when one of the party ends up dead. Which, as a reader, comes as no surprise as the destination of the getaway is the remote Scottish Highlands.

As the tale unfolds, there are colourful characters, dark secrets, and twists and turns. For once, I did not hold a lot of sympathy for the victim – but maybe their character was as insecure as those around them.

I enjoyed that the narrative is told from different viewpoints – each revealing different hints, clues and secrets as the tale unfolds. It was also quite a treat that the conclusion hinted at a happy ending for two characters who may have been running from their past. (And become caught up with quite a complex group of ‘friends’).

This is a book that may lead you to question if we ever really know anyone. A great read!

Safe House by Jo Jakeman

I was sent a copy of ‘Safe House’ by Jo Jakeman as part of its blog tour. I was rather excited, as it is the first time I have had the chance to take part in such an event. And, wow, what a novel to start with.

‘Safe House’ is an excellent contemporary thriller, the perfect novel for these dark nights. Charlie Miller is ready to start a new life in Cornwell; it has been a difficult couple of years and it is time to shake off the ghosts of the past. Steffi Finn was that past, but Charlie knows she has to be long forgotten, as does the relationship she had with the now convicted murderer, Lee Fisher. However, how ever far she goes, she can not shake the feeling that the past is following her.

The thriller has all the ingredients of an excellent tale. A colourful collection of characters, an excellent atmospheric setting, and a number of twists and turns that take you on quite an adventure with Charlie as she tries to start a new life.

I could not put this book down, as the story is told through the past and present, which means there are two tales being told. You are drawn in, wanting to know what forced Charlie Miller to want a safe house so far from everything she has known before…and who she was.

This is a five-star read for all of you who are fans of a chilling thriller. So, I would suggest picking up a copy of Jo Jakeman’s novel and finding a cosy place to settle down and read on these dark nights.

And, as a bonus, the ebook of ‘Safe House‘ will be 99p, on Amazon, throughout November – so why not treat yourself?

The Hound of Death by Agatha Christie

Short stories are not usually my thing, although as I have got older, I have become less averse towards a collection of shorter tales. Ones from the pen of Agatha Christie are sure to be a crowd-pleaser – especially if they are spooky at this time of year.

However, for me, this was not a classic from Agatha Christie. In fact I was a little conflicted by this book. Some of the tales were excellent – especially those that had a crime element. I love a bit of supernatural mind games, especially when there is another twist for the culprit. The traditional ghostly tales were good too. Yet, I found a few of the stories did not hold my attention and when I had reached the conclusion, I was not sure I had taken in what had happened.

This was October’s ‘Maidens of Murder’ choice, which means I was again encouraged to pick up a title by Agatha Christie that I may have otherwise missed. I am glad that I have read this book because I am a fan of Christie’s work but can risk falling into the trap of only reading the famous titles. This just won’t go down as one of my favourites.

The Taking of Annie Thorne by C J Tudor

C J Tudor is another author that I immediately associate with October. I read ‘The Chalk Man’ this time last year, so when I saw that ‘The Taking of Annie Thorne’ was out, I had to add it to the October reading list.

C J Tudor certainly knows how to write an atmospheric thriller. This novel does not disappoint as a gripping page-turner, with quite some twists and turns. It is a novel woven from the past and present of the central character, Joe Thorne, as he is drawn back to his old home town and is forced to face up to the events of the past. Can he stop history from repeating itself?

For me, the only issue is it leaves a big question unanswered as reach the conclusion. I suppose that can add to the mystery of the novel, however as I am quite a fan of detective-style mysteries, I like a clean and finished story – not a question mark.

This does not take away from the fact that this is a brilliant book for these dark autumn nights. It will certainly chill and thrill you as you read it, and you will want to know what happened – past and present.

I do hope that there is more to come from the pen of C J Tudor, as I feel her novels need to be a regular feature of my October reading list.

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirely Jackson

I have only ever read Shirley Jackson books in October. She is just an author I associate with these Autumn nights since picking up ‘The Haunting of Hill House’ last October. I am also going to make a bold statement – ‘We Have Always Lived in the Castle’ is better than ‘The Haunting of Hill House’.

‘We Have Always Lived in the Castle’ may not be as openly ‘horror’ as ‘The Haunting of Hill House’, but Jackson’s excellent writing builds a chilling tale with excellent black comedy. As I read this novel, I enjoyed the fact that you never know exactly what is ‘reality’. There is so much mystery surronding the Blackwood family and their dark secret – and they let it engulf them such that, even as the reader, there are points where you don’t know if you can believe what you are reading.

However, there is also a lot of charm to this book as you build empathy for the characters. After all, if the village you live in has isolated you from society, then that could well skew your idea of quite how live should be. And, just as with Hill House, the Blackwood House is as much of a character as the ‘people’ of the book.

Throughout the story, there are hints to the truth. Although, by the end, I think there are still some loose ends – depending on how you take the tale.

For me, the thing that really freaked me out was the little spider icon at the close of he novel. After all, I really do not like spiders.