Noah Could Never by Simon James Green

Now, it is not often I read a sequel so quickly, but as I am reading with pride this month, I had to find out what happened next to Noah Grimes.

I enjoyed this title even more that the first one. I mean, poor Noah’s awkward adventures do feel like they only happen to him, but – just like the first – I think we all remember how everything seems like such a big deal when you are young. Especially, in this case, if you took part in a school exchange (mine was to Italy).

However, what is really important in this book is the development of Noah and Harry’s relationship. There is such a minefield to teenage relationships and the insecurities that come with it. I felt it was handled really well in Green’s novel, He makes it clear, through Noah and Harry, that there is no ‘normal’; all relationships are individual. By the end, I think Noah learns a very important lesson about love.

There really are a lovely light-hearted read, especially in these strange times. I mean, who can’t help getting the giggles at the thought of a goose swallowing the diamonds (although I did wonder if this was a nod to ‘The Adventures of the Blue Carbuncle’ by the wonderful Sir Arthur Conan Doyle). And, if you are a fan of pretty much any detective novel, you will relate to Noah’s rather over-active imagination.

There books are simply a delight, with a colourful cast of characters finding their way in the world (and that is not just the teenagers) and through relationships.

Noah Can’t Even by Simon James Green

June continues, as does my readin books with Pride. This next one was another I chose because of Bookstagram (maybe I am easily influenced) but, in all fairness, I have had my eye on ‘Noah Can’t Even’ for a while.

Now, to begin with, I was worried this book was farce. A little too silly and far-fetched, over-emphasised the awkward humour of being a teenager. Specifically, a teenage boy. However, my opinion changed as I read more of the book. In fact, as the story and characters developed, it became more charming.

Noah Grimes’ journey of self-discovery could certainly be relatable to so many readers. I mean I am pretty sure that many of us would agree that those early to mid-teen years are a bumpy road. Especially when it comes to fitting in (although we all know now that is not the be all and end all), and the pressure surronding sexuality. Although, poor Noah Grimes does seem to experience a series of unfortunate events on his journey. He thinks he wants a ‘normal’ life but, really what is ‘normal’?

Noah is such a great character who, at times, you may think is not making the best choices, especially when it comes to his best friend Harry. But you really do hope he will find his happy ending. And, maybe, he should accept a new idea of normal.

This is probably a younger YA book and would probably be a great one if you have some reluctant readers. But, to be honest, if you love to laugh and enjoy a good story, I would recommend this book.