Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

I can not thank HayleyFromHome enough for sharing this book with me. This novel has to be one of the loveliest stories I have ever read and every moment has been pure joy.

I did break the golden rule as a bookworm and watch the film first (well I was on a long-haul flight). However, this has not taken away from the enjoyment of the book because the film is just as enjoyable.

This is the kind of YA fiction that world needs. Simon is a typical teenager, struggling a little with his place in the world as he deals with his identity. We follow Simon on his journey as he comes out to his friends and family – and gets to know the mysterious ‘Blue’.

The whole story is beautifully written – alternating between the standard narrative and the email exchanges between Simon and ‘Blue’. It is such an ordinary yet important tale for the modern world and, in fact, it is a shame that this is not the kind of novel that hit popular YA audiences sooner.

What struck me about this book, and comes from the title, is what really is the normal agenda? Who decides what is ‘normal’? (A question Simon and Blue discuss).

This novel, for me is a modern classic – one I want to share with everybody (just like the film). So, thank you again, HayleyFromHome, for sharing it with me this festive season.

The Woman in the Window by A.J.Finn

The title of this novel immediately made me think of that classic film ‘Rear Window’. Not a bad first thought as, like the central character Dr Anna Fox, I love those classic films, so I thought I was likely to enjoy this novel.

It is clearly inspired by all those Hitchcock-style films as Dr Anna Fox is unlikely to leave her house and her only real day-to-day contact with the outside world is through the windows of her home. Like ‘Rear Window’, she witnesses what appears to be a crime but, with her muddle of the real world, film plots, memories and medication, nobody seems to believe her. The evidence is also scarce and Anna wonders if she can even rely on herself.

This is an engaging thriller with plenty of twists and turns. One of the plot twists was a little obvious, however there were plenty of other surprises along the way. I also thought that Finn’s nods to so many of the classic films was a nice touch – in fact, I have a film list now from all the references. After all, they clearly were some inspiration for the novel.

I did race through this book at some speed, as I was always keen to know what would happen next and what some of the dark secrets were. It is a great thriller, which is something we all need sometimes.

Have you read ‘The Woman in the Window’ or any other thrillers I need to add to my wish list?